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What did Scone look like in the Middle Ages

A team of researchers have stared a new project that will give us a look at how Scone, one of Scotland’s medieval royal centres, looked like and why it was so important to the development of the Scottish kingdom.The University of Stirling and working in co-operation with Scone Palace, is hosting a free public event in Perth on Sunday 30 March – to reveal what Scone was like in medieval times and develop awareness of Scone’s cultural, historic and symbolic significance.
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Women and Men in the Brewer’s Gild of London

Women and Men in the Brewer’s Gild of LondonBy Judith M. BennettThe Salt of Common Life: Individuality and Choice in the Medieval Town, Countryside and Church. Essays Presented to J. Ambrose Raftis on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday, Edwin B. DeWindt, ed. (Medieval Institute Press, 1995)Introduction: In the countryside of medieval England, brewing was largely a female trade.
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The Luffield Priory Grange at Monkbarn

The Luffield Priory Grange at MonkbarnRichard JonesNorthamptonshire Archaeology, 2002, 30, pp. 126-139AbstractThe origins and development of the monastic demesne of Monksbarn can be traced in eighteen documents contained in the Luffield Priory cartulary. These provide valuable information regarding the nature of the agricultural resources of the grange, its general location and size.
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Pont-de-l’Arche or Pitres? A location and archaeomagnetic dating for Charles the Bald’s fortifications on the Seine

Pont-de-l’Arche or Pitres? A location and archaeomagnetic dating for Charles the Bald’s fortifications on the SeineBy Brian Dearden and Anthony ClarkAntiquity, Vol. 64 (1990)Introduction: Charles the Bald (grandson of Charlemagne) ruled the West Franks from AD 843 to 877. During these years his kingdom took the brunt of the Danish Viking attacks, mainly concentrated on the Seine and Loire rivers, with Paris and Orleans as principal targets.
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Anselm on the Cost of Salvation

Anselm on the Cost of SalvationLeftow, BrianMedieval Philosophy and Theology, vol. 1 (1997)AbstractAnselm’s Cur Deus Homo (CDH) discusses a number of objections to the Christian claim that God became incarnate and atoned for human sin. One objection is this: if God is omnipotent and wise and offers humanity salvation, God does not become incarnate or atone for human sin.
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The Saints of Epilepsy

The Saints of EpilepsyMurphy, Edward L.Medical History, Vol.3:4 (1959)AbstractEpilepsy, at least in its grand mal variety, presents so dramatic and, to the lay observer, so terifyinga spectacle that it is not strange that its victims readily resorted to supernatural aid for alleviation. Unlike so many other diseases it offers no external signs of its presence and the horrifying suddenness with which apparently healthy and normal people could be transformed into writhing convulsives must have gone a long way in suggesting that the syndrome resulted from visitations of God or from His temporary defeat by the powers of evil.
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